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▣ Election Crisis in Iran: An Essential Need for Transcription

posted by Andres Beiger on December 7th, 2009 at 12:52 PM

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Election Crisis in Iran: An Essential Need for Transcription

 

 

 

Twitter, that free social networking phenomena that has enjoyed a giant surge in popularity in the latter part of this decade, has recently gained validation as a vital means of communication when other avenues are blocked.

 

Twitter, that free social networking phenomena that has enjoyed a giant surge in popularity in the latter part of this decade, has recently gained validation as a vital means of communication when other avenues are blocked.
Despite its birdbrain-sounding name, Twitter has proven itself a veritable Atlas, shouldering the bulk of the information stream issuing from grassroots sources in Iran recently during the government media lockdown while post-election demonstrations raged. 
As writer Sedef Onger explains, “Twitter has won my renewed respect. Simply put, it helped bring truth to power. In a more compelling and impactful way than it’s ever done before. And clearly, in a way that no other channel or mouthpiece for information can match--In volume as well as in its eyewitness accuracy of the often-gruesome details.” (adage.com/digitalnext/post?article_id=137843)
The populace of Iran is in general an internet and tech-savvy society supplied with the equipment necessary to wage a Twitter siege. It seems that as the single-handed tool of Iranian citizens who realized the importance of keeping the rest of the world apprised of governmental human rights abuses in the wake of a clearly skewed election, Twitter provided a real-time communication backroad through which current reports from media members and individuals could bypass the governmental lockdown. In one surprising leap, Twitter has gone from a way for teens to network to an international tour de force for the dissemination of critical information. 
But even though the “Tweets” sent out by Iran’s citizens used many of the same universal coding methods, drawing from a vocabulary of around proprietary 140 characters in the Twitter lexicon, the fact that these Tweets were nevertheless written in the Farsi language meant an extra step was required before the world could digest the communications. So the question becomes, how do you get these messages out there in an language that more people can understand? The quick and dirty way is to use one of many new on-line robot Twitter translation services such as Twitter Translate, Twitlator and TweeTrans to name a few but the expert way is to first transcribe and then translate with a professonal translator. Check out the process here: www.houseoftranscription.com/process.html
Translation of the Farsi Tweets was a vital part in the process of bringing the abuses and often horrors of Iranian events to the world’s attention. Firms like House of Transcription with their staffs of linguists provide that irreplaceable link which connects people in virtually every country of the world to an international community which abhors human rights abuses and seeks to win respect for all peoples.
Translation and transcription of languages play essential roles in world communications. Whether called for in crisis situations or commercial settings, the importance of conveying information in words that many different cultures can understand is incalculable in furthering world unification. 
 
 
 

 

last edited on January 8th, 2010 at 3:25 PM

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